BSc course runs into student trouble in DU | delhi | Hindustan Times
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BSc course runs into student trouble in DU

Voices of dissent and dissatisfaction related to the restructured BSc Programme at Delhi University (DU) have resurfaced again, reports Ritika Chopra.

delhi Updated: Oct 16, 2008 00:36 IST
Ritika Chopra

Voices of dissent and dissatisfaction related to the restructured BSc Programme at Delhi University (DU) have resurfaced again.

Despite the changes made to the syllabus by a review committee set up specially after the restructured course recorded a failure rate of about 70 per cent last year, the university has, yet again, been forced to promote failed students after reconsidering their results.

It has been almost two months since the first and second year BSc Programme students started protesting against their disappointing results declared on August 11. While 218 out of the 467 failed first year students have been promoted after re-declaration of results, the second year students are continuing with their agitation.

The second year students went on hunger strike last week and called it off three days later with an assurance of reconsideration from University Proctor Gurmeet Singh.

“Last year, second year students who got Essential Repeat in two main subjects were promoted, but this hasn’t happened this time. We want uniform criteria for passing and also the university to reconsider our results just as they did for the first year students,” said a second year student of BSc Programme (Industrial Chemistry) at Deen Dyal Upadhyay College.

Though the university officials claim that the situation has improved after the revision made to restructured syllabus last year and that the average failure rate this year stands at about 30 per cent, students disagree. The latter cite 50 per cent as the actual failure rate.

“The overall pass percentage for all the three years for this course stands at 85 per cent which is like any other course in the university. We reconsidered the cases of first year students because the number of failures here were comparatively high. Those who are still protesting just want us to repeat the extreme measures we took last year and promote them. Last year was different as the failure rate was very high,” said Savita M. Dutta, who headed the review committee set up in 2007 to look into the reasons for abnormally high failures in the restructured BSc Programme.

Teachers are however not surprised and feel that students will continue to fail in huge numbers if the university doesn’t address the real problem.