Can't pump out water from Games Village: Civic bodies | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Can't pump out water from Games Village: Civic bodies

The fear of the spread of various vector-borne diseases, just like the water collected at the Games Village, refuses to ebb. And the government isn't doing anything. Rhythma Kaul reports.

delhi Updated: Sep 24, 2010 23:07 IST
Rhythma Kaul

The fear of the spread of various vector-borne diseases, just like the water collected at the Games Village, refuses to ebb. And the government isn't doing anything.

The Delhi government and civic agencies have abandoned all plans to pump out water from the Commonwealth Games Village. Reason: They have no place to pump out the water.

The government had initially asked the National Disaster Management Authority and explored asking the Army to look for ways to drain out water from the area.

"It didn't work out. There's no question of pumping out water; where do we divert the water towards with the Yamuna already overflowing?" asked Dr V.K. Monga, chairman of the MCD's public health committee.

"We can't pump out water on the roads as it will lead to further waterlogging."

He said digging wells to store water is also not an option, as the ground water level has risen in the last couple of months from about 100 feet to 10 feet below the surface.

Incessant rains over the last couple of months have resulted in accumulation of rainwater within the premises, which at some places is as deep as 30 feet.

The areas on the sides of the stretch starting from Mayur Vihar-I till the Nizamuddin Bridge, the stretch from Akashardham temple towards the metro line and near Gate no.1 of the Village are waterlogged.

Pools of water mean breeding of mosquitoes and health experts fear not just disease-causing mosquitoes, if the situation did not improve, the entire area could turn into a mosquito hub.

"It doesn't necessarily have to be dengue-causing mosquitoes. There's malaria, chikungunya and other vector-borne diseases. Wet surfaces are ideal breeding grounds for all kinds of mosquitoes," said a senior health official in the Delhi government.

Spraying of larvicide is the only possible solution but not an effective one.

"Since the water is flowing, the insecticide sprayed isn't very effective. We are spraying twice a day which requires extra manpower and money," said an MCD official.

The problem will become worse once the water starts receding.

"We will have to start from scratch once the water starts settling. Rains have wrecked havoc this year," said Dr Monga.