Conjoined Odisha twins, separated at AIIMS, stable and improving, say doctors | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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Conjoined Odisha twins, separated at AIIMS, stable and improving, say doctors

Jagannath and Balram Kanhar were joined at the head and a team of 40 doctors operated on the 27-month-old babies to separate them.

delhi Updated: Nov 01, 2017 10:12 IST
Anonna Dutt
It was India’s first separation surgery of craniopagus twins, who also shared brain tissue, nerves and major blood vessels. (ANI file photo)
It was India’s first separation surgery of craniopagus twins, who also shared brain tissue, nerves and major blood vessels. (ANI file photo)

The condition of the Odisha twins, who were joined at the head and separated by a team of doctors at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) in New Delhi, is stable and they are improving, the hospital said on Wednesday.

Jagannath Kanhar and Balram Kanhar were joined at the head at a 180-degree angle and a team of 40 doctors operated on the 27-month-old babies on October 26 to separate them.

Doctors treating the twins, who are called Jagga and Balia by their family, said their breathing is good and are haemodynamically stable or there is a good flow of blood and oxygen saturation.

Both the babies are on ventilator support but Jagga is showing a response to some commands and his fever also came down on Tuesday, they added. He is on dialysis once a day to support his kidney function, which is also improving.

According to the hospital, the twins will have to be kept in the intensive care unit (ICU) for the next seven to 10 days or more depending on their condition. The twins should slowly improve over the 10 to 15 days, it said.

After the twins underwent the first surgery to create a venous graft - a surgical procedure to redirect blood flow from one area to another by reconnecting blood vessels - in August, the doctors thought that Jagga had a better chance of survival.

But his kidney functions started deteriorating after Balia was given medication for his seizure that reached Jagga’s body through a shared circulatory system.

Last week’s surgery, in which the brain was separated and their skulls covered with skin flaps, was the second procedure the Kanhar twins have undergone. It was India’s first separation surgery of craniopagus twins, who also shared brain tissue, nerves and major blood vessels. Only 59 such surgeries have happened across the world.

Doctors have said a third surgery to graft their skull bones and cover the exposed brain will be attempted in a couple of years.

The Odisha government is paying for the treatment of the twins, who belong to a poor farmer family from Kandhamal district of the state.