Constable murder: Police arrest main accused | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Constable murder: Police arrest main accused

A week after Tanvir, the 28-year-old Delhi Police constable was shot dead at his single-room accommodation in west Delhi’s Baprola village, the outer Delhi Police on Wednesday arrested Ravinder Solanki, the main accused in the case. Solanki, a property dealer in Baprola village, had been absconding since the incident.

delhi Updated: Oct 05, 2011 23:58 IST
HT Correspondent

A week after Tanvir, the 28-year-old Delhi Police constable was shot dead at his single-room accommodation in west Delhi’s Baprola village, the outer Delhi Police on Wednesday arrested Ravinder Solanki, the main accused in the case. Solanki, a property dealer in Baprola village, had been absconding since the incident.

On September 28, he, along with his associate Pradeep Sharma, had allegedly pumped five bullets into Tanvir. The two held a grudge against Tanvir as he had stopped them from illegally grabbing a plot owned by one Shyambir in Baprola village.

Tanvir had even arrested Solanki — who was already involved in three other criminal cases — under charges of disturbing peace in the area, which had annoyed the latter.

BS Jaiswal, deputy commissioner of police (outer), said Solanki was arrested from Rohini on specific information about his movement near

Kali Mata Mandir on the Outer Ring Road.

“Our team of special staff had information about his movement. Accordingly a trap was laid near Kali Mata Mandir and Solanki was apprehended when he reached there to collect some money from an acquaintance,” said Jaiswal.

During interrogation, Solanki revealed that he and his associate Sharma used to deal in disputed plots in undeveloped colonies in Ranhola area.

“Their modus-operandi was to create unnecessary dispute over plots of poor people. They would claim ownership of the land and then settle the matter by taking hefty amounts from genuine owners. Beat officers Mukesh and Tanvir were aware of their tricks and used to keep an eye on their activities,” Jaiswal said.

“Whenever any party used to approach them for sale or purchase of a plot, Tanvir used to intervene and caution the party to not get trapped. He had been able to restrict their illegal activities, which caused huge losses to them. So the two decided to settle the score with the beat constables,” Jaiswal added.