Curious case of CW Games’ catering contract | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Curious case of CW Games’ catering contract

This bit of news is hard to digest. The contract for catering to the thousands of athletes, officials and support staff in the Commonwealth Games village is ending up costing much more than it was originally meant to.

delhi Updated: Aug 01, 2010 01:00 IST
Ajai Masand

This bit of news is hard to digest. The contract for catering to the thousands of athletes, officials and support staff in the Commonwealth Games village is ending up costing much more than it was originally meant to. And even more curiously — after the the organising committee (OC) said that no Indian company could handle the contract – at least part of the catering will be handled by an Indian firm. Even though the contract has been won by an Australian company.

This was confirmed by OC chief Suresh Kalmadi in a stormy press conference in New Delhi. The contract, after delays and cancellations, was awarded to Delaware North. But Delaware North has outsourced part of the operations to the Taj group.

An OC official, not wishing to be quoted, said the initial contract was in the range of R150-170 crores and was bagged by Delaware North, which specialises in providing catering services in major sporting events. “But after the re-tendering, which interestingly, also went to the same company, the company jacked up the cost.”

Kalmadi clarified this, saying no Indian company was found eligible. He also confirmed that the payment had gone up. “The cost has not gone up two-fold but it has gone up. We had no choice as the Games were just months away and we had to quickly put things in place,” he said. He also confirmed that Delaware had sub-contracted to the Taj group. “Yes, Taj Group is also on board,” he said at the press conference. The OC chairman had no answer as to why the re-tendering was done in the first place, but sources say it was done after Indian companies objected to only the Australian firms’s bid being accepted.