Delhi colleges in a fix over OBC quota cut-off | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi colleges in a fix over OBC quota cut-off

Delhi University’s decision to offer a maximum of 10 per cent relaxation in cut-offs to OBC candidates has left colleges confused and unsure of what procedure to follow, reports Swaha Sahoo.

delhi Updated: Jun 11, 2008 19:55 IST
Swaha Sahoo

Delhi University’s decision to offer a maximum of 10 per cent relaxation in cut-offs to OBC candidates has left colleges confused and unsure of what procedure to follow. While some have decided to offer full 10 per cent relaxation, others say they will decide the cut-off after applications are received.

For instance, if the general category cut-off for BA (H) History in a college is 85 per cent, colleges can offer up to 75 per cent relaxation for OBC candidates. They can also fix the cutoff anywhere between 75 and 85 per cent.

However, this method has created confusion among colleges. “We will give a full 10 per cent relaxation. Which means that anyone with 75 per cent and above (taking the above example) can apply,” said Rajendra Prasad, principal of Ramjas College. “We will then make a merit list of all the students who qualify the cutoff and then take the best as per the number of available seats,” Prasad said.

The catch is that once students qualify for the cut-off, the college cannot deny admission on any ground. “It’s a legal issues. If a student has qualified, then you have to give admission irrespective of whether you have that many seats or not,” said S.K. Vij, dean of students welfare. “Therefore, colleges should be very careful in setting the cut-off,” Vij said.

Colleges such as Kamla Nehru and PGDAV (Morning) are also deciding to apply the first-come-first-serve policy for OBC candidates. “We will give admission on the basis of first-come-first-serve in case of OBC candidates. There is no other way out,” said Minouti Chatterjee, principal of Kamla Nehru College.

This means that even if an OBC candidate with lower marks approaches the college first, he would get admission. And if a high scorer reaches after the seats are filled, he would be denied admission. “The number of seats for OBC candidates given to us by the university are absolute numbers and we cannot tamper with that,” Chatterjee said.

But Vij insisted that the numbers were not absolute. “No numbers are absolute and we will have to accommodate students. Moreover, the first-come-first-serve policy is discriminatory and cannot be used to deny admission.”

He added that the university would hold another meeting with all the colleges to clarify the prevailing confusion regarding admission of OBC candidates.