Delhi Govt moves to expedite parole cases | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi Govt moves to expedite parole cases

After getting a rap from the Delhi High Court for granting parole on a selective basis to influential people, the Delhi Government expedited considering applications of other convicts, reports Vijaita Singh.

delhi Updated: Dec 14, 2009 23:56 IST
Vijaita Singh

After getting a rap from the Delhi High Court for granting parole on a selective basis to influential people, the Delhi Government expedited considering applications of other convicts.

In the last fortnight, the government asked Delhi Police for a verification report of 30 convicts who had applied for a parole.

On November 20, the high court had slammed the government for granting parole immediately to influential persons like Manu Sharma who was convicted for killing model Jessica Lall while the application of others gathered dust.

Among those who have applied for parole is a convicted terrorist of Jammu and Kashmir liberation Front (JKLF) who was arrested in January 2002, days after Parliament attack case in December 2001.

Mohammad Afzal was arrested on January 12, 2002, with three others from a hostel in Kotla Mubarakpur in south Delhi when he was planning an attack on the Republic Day parade to avenge the foiled attack on Parliament of India.

This year, the Delhi Government had received 372 parole applications. Of those, 72 convicts were granted parole while applications of 202 others were cancelled.

“Following the high court's order, the Delhi Government had asked for a detailed verification report of 30 convicts,” said a senior police officer on condition of anonymity. “As per the directives, we have forwarded them the verification report.”

The high court had directed the government to dispose all parole applications in 15 days to one month.

The Delhi government had granted parole to Sharma even though Delhi Police had strongly opposed the plea.

Sharma was sanctioned the parole within 20 days of applying. “When we write to government authorities, they just don't reply,” said a lawyer representing a convict requesting anonymity. “If you are very lucky, you can get a response, whether it’s negative or positive.”