Delhi man hired snatchers, thieves on salary, ran gang like a company | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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Delhi man hired snatchers, thieves on salary, ran gang like a company

He had recently decided to hand over the reins of his ‘company’ to his 22-year-old son, Subhash. The younger man was still in ‘training period’ when a police team from outer district arrested the father-son duo on Saturday.

delhi Updated: Jul 18, 2017 10:46 IST
HT Correspondent
47-year-old Nand Kishore alias Karate decided many years ago to elevate himself to the position of a ‘manager’ of a ‘company’ he founded, where he would ‘hire employees’ to indulge in these activities.
47-year-old Nand Kishore alias Karate decided many years ago to elevate himself to the position of a ‘manager’ of a ‘company’ he founded, where he would ‘hire employees’ to indulge in these activities.

Wary of the dangers linked with street crimes, 47-year-old Nand Kishore alias Karate decided many years ago to elevate himself to the position of a ‘manager’ of a ‘company’ he founded, where he would ‘hire employees’ to indulge in these activities.

Karate hired snatchers and thieves, and paid them salaries, much like a private company.

He had recently decided to hand over the reins of his ‘company’ to his 22-year-old son, Subhash. The younger man was still in ‘training period’ when a police team from outer district arrested the father-son duo on Saturday.

Given the elaborate arrangement and the organised manner in which Karate ran his gang, the police are planning to also book the father and son under Maharashtra Control of Organised Crime Act (MCOCA).

MN Tiwari, DCP (outer), said Karate had first entered the world of crime in 1992, and indulged in street crimes such as robbery, thefts, pick-pocketing, burglaries and drug deals.

“However, he did not find the earnings worth the risks associated with these crimes. So, he decided to elevate himself into organising these crimes, where he recruited others to carry out the risky activities,” said Tiwari.

So, Karate began hiring burglars and snatchers, police said. Investigators estimate there are over 30 members in his gang that he called “company”. These men were divided into six groups, where each member was allotted a specific role. Those who executed the snatching or thefts were called a ‘machine’.

“Karate knew that getting caught with stolen items would result in a high chance of conviction. So, his focus was on preventing the recovery of the stolen goods,” said Tiwari, adding that while one man would steal from the targets — mostly passengers in crowded buses — another man would be deployed just to get caught, if at all. Since nothing would be recovered from the apprehended man, there was little danger of legal action.

Investigators said Karate paid his men a daily salary. “The father and son mainly indulged in selling the stolen goods. He paid his employees a substantial portion of the money earned from the loot,” said an investigator.

In case a team failed to make a killing on any particular day, Karate would still pay them a certain amount, apart from ensuring three meals a day for all his men. “That kept his men loyal to him. But he had his own way of threatening the men into ensuring that no one isolated him or branched out,” said the officer.

The father and son were arrested based on a tip-off from Mangolpuri on Saturday. The recovered loot from them included 54 smartphones, 11 laptops, and Rs 2 lakh in cash. “The duo were making Rs 2-4 lakh profits every month,” said an investigator.