Delhi to get four new govt hospitals by year-end | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi to get four new govt hospitals by year-end

Delhi is likely to get four new government hospitals by the end of this year.

delhi Updated: Nov 09, 2011 01:54 IST
HT Correspondent

Delhi is likely to get four new government hospitals by the end of this year.

In a review meeting on Tuesday, health minister AK Walia directed officials from the Public Works Department (PWD) to start building those hospitals that have all requisite approvals and are only awaiting construction.

Among the hospital ready for construction are the 200-bed Burari hospital, a diabetic block in east Delhi’s Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB) Hospital, Maharishi Valmiki Hospital in Rohini and Dwarka Hospital.

Keeping in view the increasing patient load on existing government hospitals in the national Capital, Walia asked the agencies concerned to expedite the construction process.

On an average, every big government hospital caters to anywhere between 7,000 and 10,000 new patients daily.

“Every year, the number of patients keeps increasing, as a large chunk migrates to the Capital from remote areas of the country.

We aim to reduce the burden on our hospitals that face difficulties in providing health care to such a large population daily,” Walia said.

With the health minister directing its staff to fulfill the Municipal Corporation of Delhi’s requirements in the next couple of days, construction for GTB’s diabetic clinic will be the first to start.

“There is dire need for an advanced diabetic centre in east Delhi as the number of diabetic patients is fast going up,” Walia said.

The hospital recently started a dedicated 500-bed mother and child care facility.

The 200-bed Ambedkar Nagar hospital, that has been pulled out of the public-private-partnership model, will also see construction soon, as measures are being taken to seek all necessary approvals.

“While we are putting things on the fast track, we have the added responsibility to ensure that quality is not compromised,” Walia said.