Delhi to press for anti-terror convention | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi to press for anti-terror convention

Sensing Osama bin Laden's killing in Pakistan as an opportune moment, New Delhi is set to pull out all the stops to press for the adoption of the United Nations adopting the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism (CCIT).

delhi Updated: May 05, 2011 23:24 IST
Jayanth Jacob

Sensing Osama bin Laden's killing in Pakistan as an opportune moment, New Delhi is set to pull out all the stops to press for the adoption of the United Nations adopting the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism (CCIT).

India first mooted CCIT draft in 1996 and it has been tied in the knots of discussions and differences since then.

Though there are 13 UN conventions and protocols to deal with the fight against terrorism, India believes the comprehensive convention will bolster the international community's capacity to fight various kinds of terrorism.

"Osama's killing deep inside Pakistan also brings the opportunity to embolden the fight against terrorism and its safe sanctuaries. We will be pressing ahead with this issue, seeking the help of all countries", sources said.

At present, India's permanent representative to UN, Hardeep Puri is the chairman of the counter-terrorism committee of the world body as well.

And India also holds that the inability of the United Nations to agree on the CCIT remains "one of the most important lacuna in the international legislative framework" in the fight against terrorism. The discussions for its adoption still remain tangled in the 'adhoc committee' negotiations.

The Organistaion of Islamic Conference (OIC) member countries, especially, have many reservations regarding these issues. But sources see a silver lining in Turkey, an important OIC member, throwing its weight behind the convention last year.

"The definition of terrorism proposed by us does not prejudice against security forces. It makes it clear that all the forces in combat operations are liable under the international humanitarian law," said an Indian official.