Delimitation draws a line of divide | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jan 17, 2018-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Delimitation draws a line of divide

It changed poll equations for political parties in the Capital, but for residents of New Friends Colony, delimitation has given rise to a strange conundrum.

delhi Updated: May 02, 2009 23:39 IST
Ritika Chopra

It changed poll equations for political parties in the Capital, but for residents of New Friends Colony, delimitation has given rise to a strange conundrum. With three blocks — A, B and C — of this posh residential area now part of East Delhi parliamentary constituency, residents are fretting over the implication of their association with an area still trying to rid itself of the down-market “yamuna paar” tag.

Till the last Lok Sabha elections, New Friends Colony belonged to South Delhi constituency. Now, just Block D remains in south Delhi.

Jyoti Gupta (60), a resident of Block C, is among the disgruntled lot, which perceives the change with scepticism. “It’s a little threatening to learn that we are no longer part of South Delhi. Moreover, our aspirations, problems and needs are not in sync with that of the other areas falling in the east bracket,” she said.

“Though I have nothing against the idea of redrawing constituency lines, the authorities should have shown some respect to the structure of our colony. Even though we have common problems, two different people will now address them. In the long run disparities will emerge and the colony will suffer,” said A.S. Kohli, a professor with Jamia Millia Islamia.

The residents’ welfare association of the colony had made some noise over the change when the redrawn constituencies were announced. “It’s bad enough that our colony with some 11-odd houses comes under two assembly constituencies. We have been divided once again in the case of the parliamentary elections. We had approached our MLA and a few politicians to correct the anomaly, but were told it's too late,” said Harish Kapoor (67), general secretary, of the association.

The electoral process has already turned complicated for the 6,000 voters here. Two candidates, instead of one, of each party (contesting for South and East) are being invited to address the residents.

But even as many crib over the fragmentation, there are few residents who feel delimitation won’t really change anything. “Residents of blocks A, B, and C are crying hoarse over their property prices being affected, but if you look closely these blocks are anyway not doing too well in comparison to block D. That is because it is flanked by urban villages. They just don’t like the idea of being associated with East Delhi,” said a resident of block D, who did not wish to be identified.