Dry days ahead: Dwarka may not get water till March 8 | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Dry days ahead: Dwarka may not get water till March 8

On Monday, north and central Delhi, along with Dwarka and Palam, did not get water supply because of the damage to the Munak Canal and high ammonia contamination in the water received through the Yamuna channel.

delhi Updated: Mar 01, 2016 00:34 IST
Mallica Joshi
Water crisis in Delhi
Water tankers of the Delhi Jal Board have been pressed into service after several areas did not get water supply because of the damage to the Munak Canal and high ammonia contamination in the water received through the Yamuna channel.(HT Photo)

The Delhi Jal Board (DJB) is looking at permanent measures to ensure that pollution does not stop water supply to the city.

Struggling to meet its water demand because of the heavy damage to the Munak Canal during the Jat quota stir and high pollution levels in the Yamuna, the water utility has decided to look at options that will keep all water treatment plants running irrespective of contamination levels.

On Monday, north and central Delhi, along with Dwarka and Palam, did not get water supply because of the damage to the Munak Canal and high ammonia contamination in the water received through the Yamuna channel.

All water treatment plants, barring the Dwarka plant, were made functional on Monday evening after the volume of highly-polluted water flowing from the Yamuna was restricted. Tuesday will see water supply resume to most parts of the city, except Dwarka and parts of Palam.

“We are looking to connect the Wazirabad and Chandrawal water treatment plants directly to the Munak Canal through an internal channel so that water is not sent to the Wazirabad pond from the Munak Canal. This way, even if water in the Wazirabad pond is contaminated, the treatment plants will remain partly functional. Apart from this, DJB is looking at technology to decompose ammonia in the river so that the problem can be tackled even if the water from Haryana is polluted,” said DJB DEO, Keshav Chandra.

Dwarka, however, will have to remain without piped water till the Munak Canal is not repaired. According to official estimates, it will take at least till March 8 for the damaged section to be fully functional again.

Water shortage in housing complexes in the area has become a major issue with people shifting to hotels and to relatives’ houses to tide over the crisis. The distribution of tankers is unequal and where no one is at home during the day, the problem is magnified.

Since east and large parts of south Delhi do not get their water from the Yamuna, the areas remained largely unaffected over the past two weeks.