East Delhi turns into a dump yard | delhi | Hindustan Times
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East Delhi turns into a dump yard

The streets and lanes of east Delhi, which had started to resemble the Ghazipur and Okhla dump yards, will finally be cleaned from Saturday as the sanitation workers called off their strike on Friday evening.

delhi Updated: Jun 13, 2015 00:17 IST
HT Correspondent

The streets and lanes of east Delhi, which had started to resemble the Ghazipur and Okhla dump yards, will finally be cleaned from Saturday as the sanitation workers called off their strike on Friday evening.

HT visited various localities of east Delhi on Friday and found residents finding it hard to navigate their way through the stinking garbage heaps.

Mahender, a cycle stand owner in Shiv Puri Extension, complained of low footfall. "I have had no customers since morning. There is no space left for parking. The commuters are facing great difficulty," he said, adding that three accidents took place in which two-wheelers skid.

A number of shops and a clinic in the area shut temporarily because of the stench.

Ekta Kapoor, a resident of Hazara Park, is worried about her three-year-old's health. "This rubbish has been there for the last 12 days and is becoming a breeding ground for insects, which can cause bacterial infections. There was a lot of talk about sweeping but now no one is coming forward to clean this waste," she said.

The residents of Rani Garden had another bad day as the constant stench from stockpiles of garbage made life miserable and left no room for public movement.

Joginder Kaur, a housewife, said: "We lodged a complaint last week but no action was taken. The accumulation of garbage added to the stagnant sewage systems of the area."

Soniya, another resident, has to travel through the Rani Garden crossing every day. "I witnessed two accidents that happened because of the stockpile of garbage. The two-way road turned into one-way, causing a lot of discomfort to the pedestrians as well as motorists," she said.

25-year-old Neha, who works in Ayushman Mother and Child clinic in Krishna Nagar, said various medical institutions in the area were badly hit by the stench. "The waste caused traffic jams. People wanting to visit the clinic were forced to take a completely different route and this caused great inconvenience to them," she said.

With inputs from Nalini Menon, Aditi Juneja and Hephziba Lakhanpal