For many, hope floats with 2nd, 3rd lists | delhi | Hindustan Times
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For many, hope floats with 2nd, 3rd lists

Fretting over the high cut-offs in the first list? Relax. Chances are the cut-offs are inflated and will come down in the second, third and even the fourth lists in several colleges, reports Tanya Ashreena.

delhi Updated: Jun 29, 2009 00:23 IST
Tanya Ashreena

Fretting over the high cut-offs in the first list? Relax.

Chances are the cut-offs are inflated and will come down in the second, third and even the fourth lists in several colleges.

“As Delhi University allows students to apply to as many colleges as possible through the centralised forms, students fill in several options in case they do not get through the college or course of their choice,” said Meera Ramachandran, principal, Gargi College.

“As a result most colleges have to come out with second or third cut-off lists.”

Last year, several popular courses in elite college had fourth cut-offs.

While Lady Shri Ram College was unable to fill its seats for Maths and Philosophy till the fourth list, Ramjas College had a fourth cut-off for B Com Programme and political science.

Jesus & Mary College also brought out a third cut-off list to fill its seats in B Com and sociology.

“Students who do not get through the first list should not lose heart because there may be students who will have applied to the course, but may not end up taking admission. This will cause the cut-offs to fall,” said Kanan Nanda, principal, Daulat Ram College.

Faculty members feel that as cut-offs fall, a student who has not made it to the first list in course of his or her choice might make it in the third or fourth lists.

In such a scenario, they feel that the student must always choose the course over the college.

“Whenever a student has to make a decision between the college or the course, I always advise them to choose the course. In DU, the faculty everywhere is the same, as we follow the same criteria while selecting them,” said Seema Parihar, deputy dean students’ welfare.

“Moreover, the course determines what a student will study over the three years, and eventually his or her future.”