Govt reluctant, but IPS association learns to stand up against oppression | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Govt reluctant, but IPS association learns to stand up against oppression

The Centre may be unwilling to stand up for its All India Service (AIS) officers posted at the state-level but the officers are finally learning to stand up for themselves. Aloke Tikku reports.

delhi Updated: Sep 16, 2013 00:07 IST
Aloke Tikku

The Centre may be unwilling to stand up for its All India Service (AIS) officers posted at the state-level but the officers are finally learning to stand up for themselves.

In an unusually blunt representation, the Indian Police Service (Central) Association has accused the states of using suspensions to edge out upright officers acting against vested interests or deflect adverse public reaction from the state government.

The representation was given to the Department of Personnel and Training (DoPT) — which is headed by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh— last month. But DoPT officials have indicated that the UPA government was unwilling to restrain the states from unbridled abuse of its suspension powers.

A police officer, however, said that the positive fallout of the controversy over the abuse of the power of suspension was that associations — unlike the police leadership — were finally beginning to stand up.

“Analysis of various instances of suspension indicates that quite often tough action by a particular officer in public interest and against a powerful vested interest group, had preceded his/her suspension. The suspension orders in such cases were issued based on some unrelated instances of so called ‘breach of public interest’,” IPS association general secretary Pankaj Singh said in the letter.

By way of examples, he cited the case of Ajay Misra (IPS, UP: 2003) who was suspended in 2009 and remained out in the cold for 15 months for doing his job.

“There have also been increasing instances of officers getting suspended only for deflecting the adverse public reaction against the government, as in the case of Mayank Srivastava who was suspended after the Maoist attack in Chhattisgarh’s Darbha Ghati in May this year.

The association went on to assert that even as the honest and competent officers were being suspended ostensibly in public interest, there were several instances of select officers getting away lightly for serious misconduct including bribery.

“Such officers continue to occupy important assignments and even get their promotions in time in violation of all rules,” the IPS (Central) association said, insisting that “the increasing regularity of selective exercise of disciplinary powers cannot be a mere coincidence or aberration”.