Govt to the rescue of Sushruta Centre | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Govt to the rescue of Sushruta Centre

Sushruta Trauma Centre (STC) — the only trauma centre in north Delhi — will finally be linked to Lok Nayak and GB Pant hospitals for a steady flow of doctors.

delhi Updated: Feb 27, 2012 00:04 IST
Jaya Shroff Bhalla

Sushruta Trauma Centre (STC) — the only trauma centre in north Delhi — will finally be linked to Lok Nayak and GB Pant hospitals for a steady flow of doctors.


Delhi government's health department decided on the merger on Saturday. They are hoping that this will not only bridge the specialist shortage, but also improve the ailing infrastructure, needed for trauma care.

Department officials said the merger was likely to come into effect in the next two months.

The city's biggest trauma management facility, located on Outer Ring Road near inter-state bus terminal, Kashmere Gate, has been suffering from acute specialist shortage ever since it was made an independent unit in February 2007.

In the last five years, the centre, which caters to emergency patients, has not had a steady neuro-surgeon, anesthetists, a radiologist or even functioning CT scan and MRI machines.

"We have been taking several measures to fill in the vacancies. In the last five years, the head was also changed at least five times, but nothing seemed to help change the situation," said Dr AK Walia, Delhi health minister.

"This step was really needed. While the medical superintendent will report to the head of Lok Nayak, we have placed the orthopaedic department of STC under Lok Nayak. The neurosurgery department will function under the supervision of GB Pant hospitals. Specialists from the bigger hospitals will work in STC on rotation," he said.

The trauma care receives at least 50 new trauma cases daily and performs 150 major surgeries every month. Emergency cases from as far as Sonepat and Panipat are taken to STC for emergency treatment.

"This decision should have come at least two to three years back. Forget senior consultants in neurosurgery or radiology, there have been no resident doctors to fill in for them either," said a doctor requesting anonymity.