HC refuses stay on DU’s 4-yr undergraduate courses | delhi | Hindustan Times
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HC refuses stay on DU’s 4-yr undergraduate courses

In a major relief to the Delhi University administration, the Delhi High Court on Wednesday refused to stay the introduction of four-year undergraduate programme, reports Harish V Nair.

delhi Updated: May 09, 2013 02:19 IST
Harish V Nair

In a major relief to the Delhi University administration, the Delhi High Court on Wednesday refused to stay the introduction of four-year undergraduate programme.

An NGO, Sambhavna, had alleged that the course, which will commence from this academic session in July, was discriminatory against visually-impaired students of the university. The NGO had raised objections on various counts, major among them being that two mandatory foundation courses based on mathematics and science would be a hurdle for visually-challenged students.

"Why should we stay it? The course anyways is beginning only in July. We will hear the petition next week," a bench of Chief Justice D Murugesan and justice Jayant Nath told the NGO’s lawyer, Pankaj Sinha. The petition had sought a stay on the course till the university made special arrangements for the differently-abled.

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The court, however, issued notice to the Delhi University seeking to know by May 15 what extra facilities and provisions have been made so that the visually-impaired students do not face any difficulties in adopting the course.

DU’s counsel MJS Rupal told the court that the university is considering extra facilities for such students and a meeting on Wednesday was being convened in the to deal with their grievances.

Sinha, a visually-impaired lawyer, told the court that visually-challenged students are exempted from studying science and mathematics after class eight in some cases and after class 10 in most cases. He said with the university making these foundation courses compulsory, which will require prior knowledge of these subjects, it would be unfair to the students if requisite arrangements are not made in advance.

He said another major concern was access to sufficient reading material for such students such as Braille textbooks, e-texts or audio texts. “Maths cannot be studied in braille,” said Sinha. They claimed the course was not discussed with disabled teachers and students.