Help reform rude Delhi, Dikshit urges private sector | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Help reform rude Delhi, Dikshit urges private sector

Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit on Thursday called for a public-private partnership of a different kind - to develop a package to change Delhi residents' "rude behaviour" so that guests during the Commonwealth Games can take back home a "good impression".

delhi Updated: Mar 18, 2010 21:31 IST

Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit on Thursday called for a public-private partnership of a different kind - to develop a package to change Delhi residents' "rude behaviour" so that guests during the Commonwealth Games can take back home a "good impression".

Speaking at the first Delhi Tourism Conclave jointly organised by the government and Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) in New Delhi, Dikshit said: "All of us are thinking of nothing but how to make Commonwealth Games successful and showcase Delhi and India. I can see a lot changing, mannerisms are changing but it's still not enough.

"We have to do some things that are extremely basic like keeping the city clean, giving our citizens the culture of politeness and sharing and caring for each other, so that the world goes back with an impression that they have been to a truly civilized city. Ranging right from how we talk to each other, how we look after our public systems," she said.

"After all, it is the behaviour of a people that one remembers," she added.

Dikshit hailed the city as unique but emphasized on an attitudinal change.

"We are a unique city, we live in the present and look to future but we also have a huge historical heritage. We can be truly proud of our rich repertoire but when we showcase it to people, especially during the Games, they should be looked after and not go back with an impression that there are small time crooks not charging proper rates (for services). All that culture needs to change," she said.

Calling for an initiative from private sector, Dikshit said: "The private sector has already partnered for raising green cover in Delhi. If other organisations want to join in cleaning up Delhi or teaching the people through campaigns how to behave and be polite... by holding meetings with youths and students and urging them to use public transport like bus or Metro, I hope that happens."

When the private sector appeals to the citizens, "it has a greater impact", she said.

"We can generate a package on how to change the culture of Delhi and the behavioural pattern that we have today not only where are language but our behaviour towards each other and the guests who come here. (This should be) implemented right away," she added.