His death gave back life to three people | delhi | Hindustan Times
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His death gave back life to three people

Like anyone else, architect Pranay Jain (27) had one life to lose. But, unlike most people, in death he had lives to give.

delhi Updated: Aug 04, 2009 01:14 IST
Rythma Kaul

Like anyone else, architect Pranay Jain (27) had one life to lose. But, unlike most people, in death he had lives to give.

A month ago, Pranay slipped and fell on his head in his bathroom. He was diagnosed with brain haemorrhage and battled for his life in the intensive care unit of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital for a week.

On July 5, he was declared brain dead.

This is when his shell-shocked but plucky family decided to let Jain live—in others—through donating his liver, corneas and blood vessels.

Three people were benefitted.

“We respected his wishes,” said Piyush Jain (29), the oldest of the three Jain brothers.
“It had started as a casual over-the-dinner-table conversation three years ago. Pranay and our other brother Priyank (25) had then decided to donate their organs.”

According to Piyush, he and brother Priyank were sure about carrying out Pranay’s wish, but their parents needed convincing.

“After initial skepticism, my father agreed, but it took some time to convince mother,” said Piyush. “Finally, when my younger brother explained that she could help end the sufferings of others by donating Pranay’s organs, she gave in.”

Days later, inspired by her grandson’s act in death, his grandmother Sukh Devi Jain (85) decided to donate her organs after death. She died of a heart attack on July 28.

Because of her age, the hospital harvested her cornea (eyes), which gave vision to two people.

“After Pranay’s donation, my grandmother too expressed her desire to donate organs, but we didn’t know it would be so soon.”

“Such cases are very rare. The family was very socially conscious and did not need much convincing to come forward and donate,” said Dr B K Rao, chairman, Ganga Ram Hospital.

“Given the acute organ shortage in the country, such donations can help save many lives,” he said.

Pranay’s heart could not be donated as no match was found.

“The blood sample didn’t match with any of our patients and we even got in touch with AIIMS, but to no avail,” said Dr Vinay Kumaran, a surgical gastroenterologist and liver transplant specialist at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital.

“Unlike other organs, the heart can only be preserved up to six hours. Most heart patients in need of a transplant are critical and don’t survive the wait period,” said Dr Naimish Mehta, surgical gastroenterologist and liver transplant specialist at the hospital.