'Hurt athlete in better condition than made out' | delhi | Hindustan Times
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'Hurt athlete in better condition than made out'

The condition of Arunima Sinha alias Sonu, the national-level volleyball player who lost her left leg after being pushed out of a speeding train, is stable.

delhi Updated: Apr 19, 2011 23:37 IST
HT Correspondent

The condition of Arunima Sinha alias Sonu, the national-level volleyball player who lost her left leg after being pushed out of a speeding train, is stable.

Doctors at the All Institute of Medical Sciences (Aiims) Trauma Centre, where she was admitted on Monday night, said her condition was not as serious as it was made out to be.

However, three units of blood had to be transfused to her, as her haemoglobin was low.

“We must give it to the doctors at Bareilly and Lucknow, who have taken best possible measures under given circumstances to minimise infection. Her wounds, especially the stump, is almost infection-free and will be closed by next Tuesday," said Dr MC Misra, chief of the trauma centre.

The doctors had opened the wounded stump under local anaesthesia to asses the level of infection. Sinha was flown to trauma centre from Lucknow with her family, who wanted specialised medical care for her.

The spine CT-scan detected fracture in three vertebrae. "These are minor fractures and don't require surgery. Six weeks of bed rest is good enough. The broken pelvic bone also does not require surgery," said Dr Vijay Sharma, associate professor and an orthopaedic surgeon with the Aiims trauma centre.

The two fractured bones in the lower right leg, tibia and fibula, however, will need to be fixed with a surgery. A team of four specialists has been created to monitor her condition around-the-clock.

Psychiatric help has also been sought from main Aiims to provide her the required mental support. “She needs to be in the hospital for at least three weeks. She is a strong-willed girl, and even asked doctors in the operation theatre if she could play again," said Dr Misra.

Doctors say it could be at least three months before they can think of fitting an artificial limb on her. "The wound on the stump first needs to heal fully, as it invariably shrinks upon healing. Only then creating prosthesis will be possible,” said Dr Sharma.