I won’t change my music for money: Brian Silas | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 25, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

I won’t change my music for money: Brian Silas

In Kamala Nehru College for a special performance, pianist Brian Silas talks about the changing face of music, its deterioration and it is all about continuous learning.

delhi Updated: Mar 09, 2017 17:01 IST
Aditya Dogra
Brian Silas
Pianist Brian Silas talks about the changing face of music and its deterioration. (Shivam Saxena/HT Photo)

It was after a decade that the illustrious pianist Brian Silas played at a college, when he Kamala Nehru College (KNC) for a special performance on their Annual Day.

“I am performing at a college after almost 10 years, I was initially apprehensive because I didn’t know how the young audience would respond to my renditions. I still get a bit nervous when I perform on stage, but I also know that whether or not you’ve heard the originals behind my work, the music still appeals to everyone,” says Silas.

But all his hesitations were unfounded. He was welcomed on stage with a thunderous applause. And the students even sang as he played. “His music was fab! I didn’t think we’d enjoy a piano recital so much, it was especially fun when he played Ajeeb Daastaan Hai,” says Arushi, a student.

Pianist Brian Silas performs onstage during Kamala Nehru college’s Annual Day celebrations. (Shivam Saxena/HT Photo)

Silas, despite being a fan of the classic (he feels the music of the ’80s is the best) admits that social media and music platforms online have been a force of change and have given helped numerous young musicians who earlier had to struggle for a platform.

“With the advent of such platforms, the young musicians have a medium to get their music out to the world. Music is a constant learning process, there is no age to start or end to learning. I started my affair with the piano at 35 and have been self-taught, every young musician should push themselves to learn more and stay confident with their skill.”

Old music had a certain charm to it. You could listen to a song and tell who is behind the composition, the lyrics and even the voice. Things have changed now; one in a million musicians make actual good music and that is sad.

Although the audience for non-Bollywood music maybe niche, he says he wouldn’t make music just for the sake of it or for money.

“Old music had a certain charm to it. You could listen to a song and tell who is behind the composition, the lyrics and even the voice. Things have changed now; one in a million musicians make actual good music and that is sad,” says Silas.

“I will not make renditions of these new songs because they do not carry the same value. We might not get that charm for a long time now. Other artists might change their music for money or for the sake of experimentation, but I will not.”