IIT professor admits errors in JEE math paper | delhi | Hindustan Times
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IIT professor admits errors in JEE math paper

The math question papers in the 2011 entrance examination of the Indian Institutes of Technology last Sunday had multiple errors that could shatter dreams of deserving candidates, a veteran IIT mathematician has confirmed.

delhi Updated: Apr 14, 2011 23:05 IST
Charu Sudan Kasturi

The math question papers in the 2011 entrance examination of the Indian Institutes of Technology last Sunday had multiple errors that could shatter dreams of deserving candidates, a veteran IIT mathematician has confirmed.

One of the country’s most highly regarded mathematicians, Professor KD Joshi of IIT Bombay told HT he has found over 10 marks-worth of errors in this year’s math papers in the IIT Joint Entrance Examination.

The errors range from logically inconsistent questions to problems where students had to mark only one correct answer when more than one of the multiple-choice options were correct, said Joshi, who has analysed IIT-JEE papers since 2003.

“The worst part is that there is nothing the IITs can do about some of the errors. And they could decide whether a student makes it to the IITs or not,” said Joshi, currently on assignment at the new IIT Indore. Joshi will formally release his analysis of the JEE question papers soon.

Joshi is the first from within the IIT system to confirm errors in the papers. Some coaching classes had claimed on April 10, the day of the IIT-JEE, that the paper had errors. Though the IITs set up a panel to probe errors, they said they had not received any complaints.

Though coaching classes in previous years too have raised concerns regarding the IIT-JEE, the apex engineering schools often dismiss these concerns — questioning their expertise and motive. Greater student confusion benefits the coaching class business, IITs argue.

Joshi’s analysis, IIT officials accepted, will be harder to ignore. “Some of the errors are ironically such that they will hurt the most diligent students the most,” Joshi said.

Just 85 marks in maths separated the first ranker and the last general candidate — over 6,000 ranks below — admitted to the IITs last year.