Imbibing anti-corruption movement in their own lives | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Imbibing anti-corruption movement in their own lives

Jantar Mantar, already a symbol of democracy, has become a magnate for people against corruption. Friday, the fourth day of the fast-unto-death by Anna Hazare and others was no different. Nivedita Khandekar reports.

delhi Updated: Apr 09, 2011 00:10 IST
Nivedita Khandekar

Jantar Mantar, already a symbol of democracy, has become a magnate for people against corruption. Friday, the fourth day of the fast-unto-death by Anna Hazare and others was no different.

Common people like professors, bank employees and even housewives are visiting Jantar Mantar in search of what they can identify with the movement.

PK Choudhury, 60, an engineer in a private firm has been visiting Jantar Mantar daily after his office hours. “If Anna Hazare can give his unconditional support for the cause, it becomes our duty to join the movement,” he said.

Sitting at a side bench, Alok Vyas, a consulting engineer, said, “I have suffered a lot because I refused to pay bribes.”

Sher Singh Punia, an advocate, half agreed. “I have personally never bribed anybody because where I live, everybody knows me. My work gets done just like that.” But he added, “But I too might pay bribe to get something done.”

There were people who remained firm even at the cost of suffering losses. Said Sasmita Patel, an assistant teacher from a DU college, “My refund amount from IT returns is pending as I refused to pay bribe to a clerk.” But not all are firm like her. Puja Mehra, a housewife from Malviya Nagar, confessed to having bribed for getting a gas cylinder sometimes.

But then added, “After coming here, I am inspired. I can join the fast against corruption too.”