Immersing Durga in environment-friendly way | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Immersing Durga in environment-friendly way

Amidst beating of drums and chanting of hymns, nearly 600 idols of Durga were immersed in Yamuna on the occasion of Vijay Dashmi on Thursday. At Kalindi Kunj, 250 idols were immersed on the culminating day of the five-day Durga Puja.

delhi Updated: Oct 06, 2011 23:40 IST
HT Correspondent
Durga

Amidst beating of drums and chanting of hymns, nearly 600 idols of Durga were immersed in Yamuna on the occasion of Vijay Dashmi on Thursday. At Kalindi Kunj, 250 idols were immersed on the culminating day of the five-day Durga Puja.

Devotees thronged the area with drums and flowers and chanted the name of the Goddess and her four children.

Amongst hordes of devotees, some could be seen packing jewellery and flowers, used in the puja, in separate bags to dispose them of instead of throwing them into the river.

With the Central Pollution Control Board coming up with a 25-point guideline for idol immersion, aimed at curbing the pollution of Yamuna, puja organisers had been initiating measures to segregate idols from items like plastic, flowers, artificial jewellery etc.

This was done as synthetic items and flowers don't dissolve in water and further lead to pollution.

Under the guidelines, barricades were put up and idols were immersed within the barricades, so that they didn't pollute other parts of the river.

The Delhi Pollution Control Committee had also sent its team to collect water samples to check the level of pollution.

“We carry out the exercise every year. We collect water samples before, during and after immersion. We are doing the same this year,” said an official of the committee.

Devotees at the immersion sites of Kalindi Kunj, ITO Bridge, Geeta Ghat and other smaller points also abstained from burning waste on the banks of the river, to avoid
pollution.

One of the guidelines mentioned was to avoid burning synthetic clothes, wooden slabs and rye at the sites. Many puja committees abided by the rules.

Ashok Bose, one of the organisers at CR Park, Pocket 52 puja, said, “We removed jewellery and flowers from the deities at the pandal before they were taken for immersion. We buried the flowers and other items.”

Bose along with many other organisations followed the guidelines this year, besides painting the Durga in natural dye.

Spokesperson for the Joint Procession Committee said, “Several voluntary organisations at the immersion points on the river took it upon themselves to recycle flowers, wood, reed and knick-knacks used in the puja ceremonies.”