In Delhi, nursery admission criteria headed for yet another rejig | delhi | Hindustan Times
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In Delhi, nursery admission criteria headed for yet another rejig

The nursery admission process in Delhi, a cause of much confusion and trouble for parents and children over the last few years due to constantly changing rules, is set for another review.

delhi Updated: Jun 28, 2015 10:47 IST
HT Correspondent
Nursery admissions
Nursery-admissions-N

The nursery admission process in Delhi, a cause of much confusion and trouble for parents and children over the last few years due to constantly changing rules, is set for another review.

The Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government has decided to change all the criteria for admission while retaining only the one related to distance. It plans to amend the Delhi School Education Act and Rules, 1973 in order to do this.

It is also looking to introduce other amendments to regulate fee hikes in private schools.

This could lead to fresh confusion during admission season later this year. Last year too, changes in rules had led to delays in the admission process as well as the ongoing academic session with several parents and schools going to court to challenge them.

The distance criterion makes up for a massive 40-60 of the total points given by schools to aspirants with those living closer benefitting the most.

The rest of the points come from factors like sibling, alumni and staff quota.

Initially, the government had in its draft bill proposed amending rule 145 of the 1973 rules so that the Directorate of Education could regulate admissions to recognised unaided schools at entry-level classes.

“The rule, if amended, has to be supported by some provisions of the Act. So we suggested that section 13 of the Right to Education Act be inserted with section 16 of the Delhi School Education Act, by virtue of which distance and draw of lot will remain criteria for nursery admissions,” said Ashok Agarwal, an RTE lawyer whose suggestions were sought by the government.

Agarwal said both chief minister Arvind Kejriwal and his deputy Manish Sisodia had agreed to this and the amendment would be brought in accordingly.

On the matter of fee hikes, sources said, Kejriwal wasn’t too happy with just a recommended amendment to section 17 of the Act and wanted stringent terms to be introduced so that action can be taken against any private school that arbitrarily hikes fees.

Section 17 deals with complaints against private schools and the constitution of committees to examine these, while sections 24 and 27 (A) deal with provisions for penalty and action.

“We have also suggested to the chief minister that instead of having someone come and complain, the Directorate should take cognizance and action, on the lines of Tamil Nadu’s fee regulation bill,” said Agarwal.

The government has also invited feedback from people on the draft bill.