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In downturn days, teaching jobs are up

Teaching, often perceived as a less important career option by engineering students, is quietly becoming the lifeline for jobseekers. Courtesy: the global meltdown.

delhi Updated: Dec 12, 2008 01:50 IST
Team HT

Teaching, often perceived as a less important career option by engineering students, is quietly becoming the lifeline for jobseekers. Courtesy: the global meltdown.

Two other factors have contributed to the new found will to teach — the recent pay hike of nearly 40 per cent for teachers at the entry level and the growing perception that teaching jobs are more secure than the high-flying corporate ones.

Bright engineers and software professionals are increasingly taking up college jobs, which may address the concern of NASSCOM (National Association of Software and Services Companies) over the poor quality of teaching in most engineering colleges. But only for the time being, some argue.

Sabyasachi Sengupta, vice-chancellor of West Bengal University of Technology to which all the private engineering colleges of the state are affiliated, said teaching won’t remain safe for long.

“Six months down the line, when placements will be hit due to the recession, many colleges will have to close shop,” said Sengupta.

But for now, in Andhra Pradesh, those who passed out in April and were to start working by September-October are still awaiting confirmation of their joining dates. And with more companies going for attrition or salary cut, they are becoming increasingly averse to taking chances.

“I was to join a Bangalore-based company in September. Now, the company has intimated that my joining date could be postponed to April 2009. So, I have joined as a junior lecturer in an engineering college,” said K. Deepak, who passed out from Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University in Hyderabad.

Sattyam Roychowdhury, managing director of Kolkata-based Techno India Group, which runs nine colleges in West Bengal, said, “With the job market being a bit shaky, many of our bright students have showed interest in working with us as faculty.” He said his institute was reaping the benefit of recession.

The IITs, however, are still finding it difficult to get good teachers. D. Gunashekharan, registrar of IIT-Kharagpur, said, “This is because we look for individuals who are highly talented and with high level of commitment to teaching. It seems that they are not the kind of people hit by the recession.”

Bangalore agrees. Dr K.N. Balasubramanya Murthy, principal, PES Institute of Technology, said, “Only the mediocre might be interested in teaching, but we know that they will not stick on and will move away once the industry recovers.”

With inputs from Ashok Das/ Hyderabad, B.R. Srikanth/Bangalore; Mou Chakraborty/Kolkata and Soumyajit Pattnaik/Bhubaneswar