Injured birds find a saviour in Delhi brothers’ rescue helpline | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Injured birds find a saviour in Delhi brothers’ rescue helpline

Birds are frequently at the receiving end of kites because the threads or maanja used to fly them have a glass coating. This coating often cuts the wings, feet, muscles and even the bones of the birds, leaving them handicapped for the rest of their lives. But now there is some hope for these birds.

delhi Updated: Aug 11, 2010 01:17 IST
Joyeeta Ghosh

Birds are frequently at the receiving end of kites because the threads or maanja used to fly them have a glass coating. This coating often cuts the wings, feet, muscles and even the bones of the birds, leaving them handicapped for the rest of their lives. But now there is some hope for these birds.

Brothers Mohammad Saud (29) and Nadeem Shehzad (32) residents of Shah Ganj, in Ajmeri Gate who run a bird rescue organisation, Wildlife Rescue, have launched 24X7 bird rescue helplines and a month-long relief and rescue camp to ensure that the injured birds receive timely medical treatment.

The brothers who have been treating injured birds for the past seven years cater to all kind of birds. “It was around 2003 when we found an injured black kite (bird) and took it to the Jain Bird Hospital in Chandni Chowk. The bird was refused treatment since kites are meat-eating birds. That was when we decided to treat these birds on our own,” said Shehzad.

Besides kites, the rooftop hospital in their house also treats owls, eagles and hawks. “No one cares about them since they are birds of prey. People still care to treat a pigeon but no one bothers about them,” added Saud. They also treat the non-meat eating birds that are handed over to a bird shelter in Sarojini Nagar.

Usually they get up to 30 cases a month but as August 15 nears, the number increase to 20 cases per day. Kite flying is part of Independence Day celebrations. The treatment ranges from applying simple medication to conducting surgeries.

“We consult doctors, read books or browse the Internet about how to treat various kinds of bird injuries. Most animal shelters or hospitals do not have the expertise to treat birds,” said Shehzad.

If a bird has been operated upon, it usually takes 50 to 60 days for the stitches to heal and once they recover, they fly off.

Though they have been working for seven years, it has been only six months they have registered themselves as a charitable organisation. “We manage all the expenses on our own. With the registration we are hoping to get some donors now,” said Saud, who along with his brother runs a business.

“We are not doing anything great. It is our duty to save them. Birds are very important to maintain the ecological balance since they are seed carriers and help in pollination,” added Shehzad.

The duo also has a message for kite fliers. “Please use saddi which have no glass coating instead of maanja.”