Is it true that new hires are the first ones to be axed? | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Is it true that new hires are the first ones to be axed?

Siddhartha Singh, 22, was delighted when he bagged a job with a reputed IT major in Bangalore in July last year while he was still in the third year of an engineering college. He could not have asked for more.

delhi Updated: Aug 27, 2009 00:31 IST
Sandeep Singh

Siddhartha Singh, 22, was delighted when he bagged a job with a reputed IT major in Bangalore in July last year while he was still in the third year of an engineering college. He could not have asked for more.

Then, the meltdown struck in the autumn of 2008 – and the company put his recruitment, along with those of several others, on indefinite hold.

“I was all set to start my career right after coming out of college. It has been two months since I graduated in engineering but I’m still jobless,” says Singh.

He has, since then, applied to many companies, but all of them told him the same thing: they would start recruiting only by the beginning of 2010.

“Even the company that recruited me has assured that it will take me (and others) in after January 2010. The wait is agonising,” says Singh.

His college had assured him of a good job after his graduation, the slowdown spoilt his party. “I hope I can start working by next year. I can’t wait anymore to get my first salary,” he says.

Our take

Your concern at not hearing from your recruiter is justified but the assumption that new hires are the first to be axed is not necessarily true. As the business cycle headed south for IT as a result of the global slowdown, IT firms put new recruitments on hold.

Experts believe that the revival will begin next year. “Companies are not ready to invest in training those on the bench without projects,” says Rajesh A R, vice president at staffing firm TeamLease Services.

“It is the unproductive ones who are usually axed first. A good performer has no reason to worry. And those who are ready to re-skill themselves are likely to survive the downturn.”

Meanwhile, you might want to look beyond IT. While companies are trying to fight the slowdown, the government’s thrust on infrastructure is creating new job openings in that sector.

“Jobs like site engineers at construction companies are still in demand,” says Rajesh. “Then, hiring in ITeS companies has opened up for profiles like technical support and IT firms are still considering those with niche skill sets.”