Jeans, contraceptives figure in latest Darul Uloom fatwas | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Jeans, contraceptives figure in latest Darul Uloom fatwas

In a statement that might trigger a dress-code debate, leading Islamic seminary Darul Uloom Deoband has said that wearing jeans or other tight-fitting clothes is not appropriate as per religious beliefs.

delhi Updated: Dec 22, 2010 18:06 IST

In a statement that might trigger a dress-code debate, leading Islamic seminary Darul Uloom Deoband has said that wearing jeans or other tight-fitting clothes is not appropriate as per religious beliefs.

In another controversial observation, it said a couple should first seek the opinion of a 'hakim' or Unani practitioner before resorting to use contraceptives if needed for medical reasons.

However, a Muslim social activist and a gynecologist from the community felt that such fatwas are rarely followed by the people.

In a posting yesterday, the seminary said wearing 'skin-tight' dresses is "not lawful" and that clothes should be "loose and simple".

It gave its opinion on the issue when asked by a woman whether wearing "skin tight" trousers and jeans were allowed as per religious beliefs.

"It is not lawful," the seminary said in its response that is posted on the 'fatwa online' section of its website.

Also asked if it was permitted to wear loose pajamas or jeans with a frock that stretches below the knees, accompanied by a head scarf, the scholars again replied in the negative.

"It, too, is not lawful. The dress should be loose and simple. And its style should resemble that of the dress of pious women," it said.

Another questioner had asked scholars at the seminary whether it was fine for him to use contraceptives given the fact that his wife has been advised by doctors to avoid pregnancy due to thyroid-related complications.

In response to the query posted on the website, Darul Uloom said consultation of a 'hakim' was needed in the case.

"You should consult any religious Muslim doctor or hakim. If he advises you the same, you are allowed to adopt any temporary contraceptive measure," read the response yesterday to the query.

When asked about her opinion on the issue of contraceptive use, social activist Shabnam Hashmi said there is no logic in coming out with such statements.

"Why only health reasons, contraceptives should be used otherwise as well," she said.

"Nobody follows them (fatwas) anyway," she said, adding such queries are many a time instigated by people who want to distract attentions from real issues confronting the society and the minority community.

Gynecologist Rehana Jabeen felt that such a statement coming from a leading religious seminary could be harmful for women.

"Anybody can understand that the advice of a doctor is crucial, but if you go by this fatwa, it is the advice of the hakims that is to be adhered to, which is obviously not a very logical thing to do," she said.