Karnataka, TN resolves electricity sharing dispute amicably | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Karnataka, TN resolves electricity sharing dispute amicably

Karnataka and Tamil Nadu, which sparred over sharing 300 Megawatts (MW) of electricity from a private producer, informed the Supreme Court today that they have amicably resolved their dispute.

delhi Updated: Apr 22, 2010 20:02 IST

Karnataka and Tamil Nadu, which sparred over sharing 300 Megawatts (MW) of electricity from a private producer, informed the Supreme Court on Thursday that they have amicably resolved their dispute.

The source of the dispute was sharing of power produced by privately owned Sajjan Jindal's JSW Energy plant in Karnataka.

As per an agreement, both states had agreed to share 150 MW of power each for April and May and under this, the Tamil Nadu Electricity Board was to receive 150 MW power through the Southern Regional Load Dispatch Center (SRLDC) till May 31.

SRLDC on April 16 had approached the apex court seeking relief as the Karnataka High Court had directed it to follow the state government's order to stop power supply to Tamil Nadu.

Separately, the Madras High Court had ordered it to continue with the supply - thus putting SRLDC in a fix.

Counsels appearing for Karnataka and Tamil Nadu handed over a draft copy of their agreement before a bench comprising Justice G S Sighvi and Justice A K Ganguly.

The apex court heard the matters of Central electricity regulator Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC), Grandhi Mallikarjuna Rao (GMR) and others who had also approached apex court against the conflicting orders passed by the Karnataka and Madras High Courts.

Solicitor General Gopal Subramnium, who appeared for the transmission company, said that the conflicting High Court orders placed the SRLDC in a fix. He further said that the High Courts should not have given such an order that was affecting functions of the statutory body.

He narrated the sequence of events and said that Karnataka had on April 3 passed the order directing the power company to stop export of power outside the state on the grounds of acute shortage.

Aggrieved by this, the Tamil Nadu Electricity Board moved the Madras High Court, which on April 7, directed that there should not be cancelling or curtailing of power supply to Tamil Nadu.

But the two states have now submitted that they have resolved their differences.