Lampur: A long way from home for Pak detainees | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Lampur: A long way from home for Pak detainees

A human rights group has alleged that Pakistani nationals awaiting deportation at the Lampur detention centre were subjected to “atrocities” and were “beaten up”, reports Vijaita Singh.

delhi Updated: Jan 11, 2010 23:36 IST
Vijaita Singh

A human rights group has alleged that Pakistani nationals awaiting deportation at the Lampur detention centre were subjected to “atrocities” and were “beaten up”.

One of the detainees Amjad Bashir (41) told HT that he suffered seven stitches on his head when a policeman attacked him to snatch Rs 4,000 from him.

“My family had sent Rs 4,000 for me from Pakistan through a money exchange service. The policeman attacked me with a steel scale, as he wanted to pocket the money,” said Bashir.

He said the incident happened two months ago. “My head still hurts,” he said.

Bashir, who was arrested in 1996 under the Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act (NDPS), has been at the detention centre for the past three years.

He said he even gave a written complaint at the local police station but no action was taken.

A senior Foreigners Regional Registration Office (FRRO) officer said they transferred the concerned policeman following the complaint.

“The injuries were self-inflicted,” said the officer on condition of anonymity.

People’s Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL), a human rights group, has alleged that the detainees were being subjected to inhumane conditions.

On January 1, three detainees — Abdul Razzak, Mohammad Sadiq alias Aslam and Rafaqat Ali — fled after allegedly fooling a sub-inspector in Kotwali area of north Delhi who was accompanying them.

Following the escape, security at the Lampur centre where the detainees were being lodged was replaced with that of Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF).

“One of the detainees had approached us requesting for speedy deportation to Pakistan,” said Mahipal Singh, general secretary, PUCL. “We were to submit his application in the High Court, but in gross violations of human rights we were not even allowed to meet him.”

A 67-year-old detainee Mumtaz Khan who has been lodged at the centre for two years said they are not being sent home despite being provided emergency passports.

“I want to appeal to the Prime Minister of India to address our plight,” said Khan, arrested under the 14 Foreigners Act for entering India illegally.

Khan is a heart patient.

“We have completed our sentences and have no reason to stay here. Even our emergency passports have been provided,” he said. “I am a heart patient and want to see my family badly.”

“We provide transit papers for Pakistani detainees as and when we get a case. A proper enquiry has to be done before that,” said a senior Pakistan Embassy official.

“The detainees complained the conditions at the camp were in no way different from a prison and they were not allowed even to arrange the purchase of sugar and tea from the market,” added Singh.