Lok Nayak wants bouncers for staff | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Lok Nayak wants bouncers for staff

Nearly two months after Deen Dayal Upadhyay (DDU) was forced to hire bouncers to prevent families of patients from roughing up doctors on hospital premises, another Delhi hospital is contemplating a similar move.

delhi Updated: Oct 02, 2012 01:01 IST
Jaya Shroff Bhalla

Nearly two months after Deen Dayal Upadhyay (DDU) was forced to hire bouncers to prevent families of patients from roughing up doctors on hospital premises, another Delhi hospital is contemplating a similar move.


A junior doctor was beaten up at Lok Nayak Hospital on Sunday evening by relatives of a patient who died. On Monday, patient services remained paralysed at the biggest Delhi government hospital that receives a footfall of more than 6,000 patients daily.

While senior consultants attended their OPDs, senior residents and interns who form the backbone of all government hospitals refused to see patients. Junior doctors abstained from OPDs, wards and emergency duties.

The patient, who was 24-yr-old with end stage renal disease and severe iron deficiency, died minutes after intern Dr Sanjay Singh Rawat drew blood sample for acid-based gas (ABG) analysis.

The patient's brother, who was right there, slapped the young doctor, threatening him with dire consequences if the intern tried to leave the hospital. The resident doctors and interns at Lok Nayak demanded the arrest of the man who assaulted the junior doctor.

"This incident is extremely unfortunate. It is nobody's business to beat up innocent doctors," said Dr Richa Diwan, medical superintendent at Lok Nayak Hospital.

"We have been discussing the feasibility of hiring bouncers but as an immediate measure, Delhi police have promised us 20 additional officers to work alongside our regular guards. We are also reactivating our rapid response team to help vulnerable doctors," she said.

"These incidents have become an everyday affair. Every time a sick patient dies, the attending doctor is left at the mercy of angry relatives," said a senior doctor from the department of surgery.

"Security has deteriorated in the past one year. This is not an isolated incident. A few months back, relatives beat up a doctor and two nursing attendants so badly that the doctor ended up in the ICU," said another doctor from the department of medicine.

Late in the evening, after two-hour meeting with health department officials, the doctors have assured that they will call off the strike.