Man collapses on Metro, commuters look on | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Man collapses on Metro, commuters look on

On Sept 6, Dinesh K. Mehta had severe chest pains and collapsed while arguing with a man to leave a seat for an old lady but no body cared to help him, reports Tanya Ashreena.

delhi Updated: Sep 24, 2008 00:37 IST
Tanya Ashreena

On September 6, Dinesh K. Mehta, a 56-year-old insurance advisor with Max New York Life Insurance, boarded a train at the Subhash Nagar metro station. Little did he know the journey would be one of the most traumatic experiences of his life.

Mehta was standing next to an elderly lady in the train, when he spotted several young men sitting. He requested a man to offer his seat to the lady.

“When the man rudely refused, I got really angry. I got into a bitter argument with him, and raised my voice. Suddenly I had severe chest pains and collapsed,” he recalled.

A bottle of water helped him get back on his feet. But he claims when he fell, no one helped him up.

“The other passengers were apathetic. No one showed any concern. On the contrary, at the Tagore Garden station, a person tried to kick my bags out of the train to get me to leave,” said Mehta.

Since he felt better after drinking water, he decided to continue his journey amidst bouts of chest pains, which became unbearable.

“I got down at Barakhamba station, and pleaded with the CISF personnel to help me to a hospital, but they refused. When I called up 100, a person asked me what they could do. Are we supposed to tell the police what to do, or should they know better?” questioned Mehta.

Finally, Mehta got himself admitted at Lok Nayak hospital, where doctors informed him he had suffered a heart attack.

“What happened to me could also happen to someone else. Although my attack was not so serious, what if it was?” he asked, “Judging by the callous attitude of the commuters, I would have just been left to die.”

Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) spokesman Anuj Dayal said, “The person concerned should have informed DMRC authorities. Our staff is trained in first-aid, and we have a tie-up with a cab service that will transport the sick person to a hospital.”

“There must have been some misunderstanding. Normally, CISF personnel are supposed to help,” CISF spokesman, Rohit Katiyar said.