Man successfully operated on for 2-inch bullet lodged in lower skull | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Man successfully operated on for 2-inch bullet lodged in lower skull

Jainendra Jyoti Singh, 38, can now hear from his left ear. A builder by profession, Singh was shot at by an unidentified man from a close range at the back of his head in Jamshedpur on September 7. Jaya Shroff Bhalla reports.

delhi Updated: Oct 31, 2011 23:22 IST
Jaya Shroff Bhalla

Jainendra Jyoti Singh, 38, can now hear from his left ear. A builder by profession, Singh was shot at by an unidentified man from a close range at the back of his head in Jamshedpur on September 7.

For 10 days, he lay unconscious with a 2-inch bullet lodged in his lower skull at the Tata Main Hospital till the family had him airlifted to Delhi.

"My son was shot at from a close range when he was returning from a Durga puja pandal," said SP Sinha, his father, a retired Intelligence Bureau official. "His condition was failing as doctors in Jamshedpur could not identify the location of the bullet," he said.

"The patient was extremely critical when he was brought to us. The bullet in his skull base had caused a communication - mixing of blood of his internal carotid artery (main vessel supplying fresh blood to the brain) and cavernous sinus (drains the impure blood from the brain) - causing an abnormal opening," said Dr KK Handa, director, ENT, head and neck surgery at Medanta, the medicity.

"The first step was to block this abnormal opening - which was causing the mixing of blood - using titanium coils by interventional neurologist Dr Vipul Gupta," he said.

After the patient stabilised, a team from ENT and neurosurgery extracted the bullet through a navigational system and intra operative C-arm, which helped them reach the exact spot of the bullet.

"It was impossible to gauge the location with a simple X-ray and MRI. We needed a navigation system to reach the inaccessible areas of the brain to extract the bullet through endoscopy," said Dr Handa.

"It was very difficult to remove the bullet as it was very close to skull base structures and could have infected vessels, which would have been lethal. He was lucky to have survived," he added.

Singh is now planning to return home after being in hospital for almost two months. "I am happy to be alive. I have two young children," he smiled.