Most road signs in Delhi don’t follow prescribed standards, says Study | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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Most road signs in Delhi don’t follow prescribed standards, says Study

In 2015, Delhi had topped the list of cities with most deaths in roads accidents at 1,622.

delhi Updated: Jun 29, 2017 17:16 IST
HT Correspondent
Over 72 per cent of road signs in Delhi do not conform to the norms laid down by the United Nations and Indian Road Congress, leading to traffic rule violations, congestion and increasing the chances of road accidents, says a study.
Over 72 per cent of road signs in Delhi do not conform to the norms laid down by the United Nations and Indian Road Congress, leading to traffic rule violations, congestion and increasing the chances of road accidents, says a study.(Virendra Singh Gosain/HT File Photo)

Over 72 per cent of road signs in Delhi do not conform to the norms laid down by the United Nations and Indian Road Congress, leading to traffic rule violations, congestion and increasing the chances of road accidents, says a new study.

In 2015, Delhi had topped the list of cities with most deaths in roads accidents at 1,622.

The study conducted by Institute of Road Traffic Education (IRTE) said, “Nearly 93% of the regulatory traffic sign boards in Delhi were found violating prescribed standards of size, installation and shape, thus making recognition of signs by shape and colour difficult.” It also said 30 such stop signs were found to be non-standard and wrongfully installed. The institute had examined 1,514 road traffic signs on 14 stretches covering 85km in 11 districts of the capital.

According to its findings, 72.5% of the signs (1,098) did not meet the requirements laid out by the Indian Road Congress’ Code of Practice for Road Signs and did not adhere to the United Nations Convention of Road Signs and Signals — 1968, of which India is a contracting party.

IRTE president Rohit Baluja said, “We recently conducted this study across Delhi and found that more than 70% of the traffic control devices including road signs, traffic signals and road markings were not up to the standard and were leading to millions of traffic violations which was not the road users’ fault.”

The findings of the study and the corrections suggested based on these findings will enable reduction of traffic violations, and improve congestion and road safety, he said.

Out of the 1,514 signs, 801 (about 53.9%), were inserted within rectangular boards of either blue or yellow colours.

“Such insertion of regulatory and warning signs defeats the purpose of colour recognition, and, therefore, makes the signage non-standard. Blue is only permitted for compulsory regulatory signs as well as facility information signs. Yellow is not prescribed by IRC except in construction zones,” it said.

It has pointed out how the PWD used blue boards, while NDMC used yellow for insertion boards, making the signage “more of a show rather than a warning”.

Chairman of International Road Federation, KK Kapila, said that India, a signatory to UN Decade of Action for reducting road accident deaths by 50% by the year 2020, accounts for the highest number of road deaths in the world. “At most of the places, the road signs are hidden, bungled, missing or wrong. Simple measures like appropriate road markings and traffic signs, and minor layout changes in the road junctions can significantly reduce road accidents,” Kapila said.