Mystery of CBSE Class 10 scores to be decoded soon | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Mystery of CBSE Class 10 scores to be decoded soon

The human resource development (HRD) ministry will conduct its first ever survey to decode whether the unprecedented high performance seen in this year’s Class 10 CBSE results is matched by an actual improvement in learning outcomes. Charu Sudan Kasturi reports.

delhi Updated: Jun 04, 2013 00:33 IST
Charu Sudan Kasturi
Central Board of Secondary Education

India’s class 10 students have qualified to enter class 11. Now, it’s the turn of the country’s largest school board – the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – to face a test.

The human resource development (HRD) ministry will conduct its first ever survey to decode whether unprecedented high performance seen in this year’s class 10 CBSE results is matched by an actual improvement in learning outcomes.

The learning assessment for class 10 students comes at a time when the country’s education community finds itself hemmed in by the euphoria of unprecedented pass rates on the one hand, and concerns on the other that an optional Board exam may be artificially inflating scores.

“The assessment survey will show, quite simply, whether the policy of making the class 10 Board exam optional has had an impact – positive or negative – on learning outcomes,” a senior government official closely associated with the plan told HT. “The mystery of these super high scores that we are witnessing may finally be decoded.”

In class 10 Board results announced last Thursday, 99% of the over 5 lakh students who appeared for a centralized Board exam passed. Another 7 lakh students opted instead for internal, school-conducted evaluations – 99.5% of these students qualified.

The option of school exams instead of the Board test was first offered to students in 2010. Under the plan, only those students who intend to shift from the CBSE to another board for class 11 need to appear for the Board-conducted test.

The idea was to reduce the stress that students face in appearing for the competitive Board exam.

But the high qualification rates for students who opt for the school-conducted tests have raised questions in the minds of many academicians about whether schools are grading their students fairly. Many teachers have privately conceded that their schools have instructed them to mark students leniently, to showcase a better performance than rival institutions and influence parents who are potential customers.