‘No climate talks in future if Cancun fails’ | delhi | Hindustan Times
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‘No climate talks in future if Cancun fails’

India today said the developing countries would find it difficult to continue climate negotiations if second commitment period for Kyoto Protocol is not ratified at the next climate summit in Mexico starting this month. Chetan Chauhan reports.

delhi Updated: Nov 10, 2010 23:21 IST
Chetan Chauhan

India on Wednesday said the developing countries would find it difficult to continue climate negotiations if second commitment period for Kyoto Protocol is not ratified at the next climate summit in Mexico starting this month. India’s stand emanates from deliberations at a recent meeting of Group of 77 (G-77) countries plus China in Mexico.

The protocol of which India and China are the biggest beneficiaries expires in 2012. Either a new regime has to be in place before end of 2011 or the United Nations has to agree on extension of the protocol.

Either of the options appears difficult as the United States and Australia are opposed to differentiated responsibility as enshrined in the protocol.

“If there is no extension of Kyoto Protocol at Cancun (Mexico) developing countries would find it difficult to continue with the negotiations,” Ramesh said after a two-day ministerial dialogue on climate change technologies in Delhi, where the ministers failed to reach any consensus.

As a result, the chair summary was released instead of a joint statement as done in 2009 after a similar meeting. The 35 nations agreed that giving poorer countries access to technology that can reduce emissions should form part of any “comprehensive and balanced” package finalised in Cancun. The technology transfer mechanism should address both adaptation and mitigation, the summary said.

There was no mention of contentious issue of intellectual property rights (IPR), on which Ramesh said there were divergent views. Most developed countries wants to give technology but want to charge for IPR, strongly opposed by the developing world.