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No respite from shrill Metro sound

It seems that residents living in colonies near the MG Road Metro station, who have lost sleep over the screeching sound of train brakes at a sharp curve on the track for more than a year, are losing hope of any solution to the problem.

delhi Updated: Aug 07, 2011 01:32 IST
Sanjeev K Ahuja

It seems that residents living in colonies near the MG Road Metro station, who have lost sleep over the screeching sound of train brakes at a sharp curve on the track for more than a year, are losing hope of any solution to the problem.

After several complaints and protests by residents of Essel Tower against the noise, the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) had agreed to install an automatic track lubricating machine by the end of May this year.

But DMRC has failed to keep its promise.

Besides, residents’ complaints with the pollution control department have fallen on deaf ears. “DMRC has failed to keep its promise of installing track greasing instrument. Our complaints to the pollution control departments of the state and the central government also have proven futile as none is ready to interfere,” said Rajesh Malhotra, president of Pearl Court Condominium.

Pearl Court is one of hi-rise buildings of the Essel Towers with about 1,000 apartments on MG Road.

On November 7, 2010, DMRC chief E Sreedharan had made a promise to Essel Tower residents in this regard by replying to them through an e-mail and had assured of some more measures to check the screeching noise.

SA Verma, the deputy chief environment officer of DMRC, had sent an e-mail dated April 19, 2011 to Malhotra, saying, “The continuous gauge face lubrication machine is being imported and likely to be received and commissioned by May 30 this year.” The residents of Essel Towers have been complaining of the screeching noise since the launch of Metro service in the city in June 2010.

In a study conducted by the DMRC at one of the affected high-rise towers, it had discovered that the noise level varied between 73 decibel (Db) and 74 Db in peak hours as against the prescribed standards of 45 Db and 55 Db.

After receiving complaints, the DMRC had started greasing the tracks. “The noise level goes down when greasing is new, but it goes up as grease dries,” said Malhotra. DMRC officials were not available for their comments.