No third phase of odd-even car rationing in Delhi? | delhi | Hindustan Times
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No third phase of odd-even car rationing in Delhi?

Learning from its experience of the road rationing scheme, the Delhi government may ditch the odd-even formula this year and choose other steps to curb air pollution in the city.

delhi Updated: Oct 14, 2016 22:45 IST
Sweta Goswami
odd-even
(Hindustan Times)

Learning from its experience of the road rationing scheme, the Delhi government may ditch the odd-even formula this year and choose other steps to curb air pollution in the city.

Speaking to HT, transport minister Satyendar Jain said the government had no plan to roll out a third round of odd-even scheme as of now.

“At the moment, the focus is not on odd-even. Instead, we are trying to implement the dedicated bus lane system as most of the 100 feet, and above, roads in the city are encroached upon by shops, which leads to more congestion. To control pollution, we are enhancing coordination with the neighbouring states on issues like stubble burning and incoming vehicles.”

He said if the need arises, the government may consider bringing the odd-even scheme in January.

With the formula having no impact on air pollution levels and the government’s own report stating that odd-even 2 “resulted in more congestion on various roads in Delhi,” the government has found implementation of the drive unnecessary for now, an official said.

Read: Odd-even may return in winter when pollution peaks, says Kejriwal

Besides, implementing the scheme is not cheap. The government had to shell out more than R20 crore for the first phase.

Even if the drive is rolled out, the government fears getting approval from the L-G could be a hurdle. “Especially after odd-even 2, it is possible that the L-G may return the proposal urging for a more detailed plan in terms of augmenting the transport system, having more air quality monitoring stations and so on,” the official added.

An analysis of the drive had revealed that the decision to conduct odd-even 2 within a span of just three months was a mistake as it led to a dip in seriousness towards the scheme.

“The share of private vehicles plying on the roads increased by almost 30-40% during odd-even 2. The government’s study found that the scheme is bound by diminishing utility, as in, with every phase its effectiveness is going to decline. So, one way is to implement it after a long gap which is why the option is not being considered right now,” said an official who works on the scheme.