Now, butterflies to get some breathing space | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 25, 2017-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Now, butterflies to get some breathing space

Other than humans, the rising pollution level in Delhi is affecting another species -- butterflies. According to the New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC), the butterfly population has come down drastically in the past few years though it could not produce any data to back its claim, reports HT Correspondent.

delhi Updated: Oct 19, 2009 23:06 IST
HT Correspondent

Other than humans, the rising pollution level in Delhi is affecting another species -- butterflies.

According to the New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC), the butterfly population has come down drastically in the past few years though it could not produce any data to back its claim.

To ensure the number of butterflies doesn't do down further and to provide a natural habitat for them, the civic agency has set up a conservatory over three acres of land in Lodhi Garden.

The council will also dedicate a portion of other major gardens for butterflies.

The conservatory has been built in such a manner that visitors can view the habitat from a natural elevated walkway.

The NDMC will fine people trying to catch butterflies.

It has also constructed a net to prevent birds from feeding on larvae.

"There are large number of trees, shrubs, climbers, grasses and herbaceous plants that provide food and shelter to different species of butterflies. The plants attract butterflies," said Subhash Chandra, director horticulture, NDMC.

"The conservatory area is open with butterflies roaming in the adjoining garden area."

Chandra said initially 24 species of butterflies would be protected in the conservatory and the number could go up.

"The presence of butterflies in an area indicates how healthy the place is. If we don't conserve them know, our future generation won't even know what a butterfly is," added Chandra.

Lodhi garden has more than 200 trees species, including bamboo and palms, and more than 100 species of shrubs with climbers that make it an ideal habitat for birds and butterflies.

"Often students catch butterflies for research. We will putt up boards informing visitors not to catch them," said a senior NDMC official.

Union Minister of State, Environment and Forests Jairam Ramesh inaugurated the conservatory on Monday.

"More such measures for public awareness should be taken up in the city," he said.

To educate visitors, the civic agency has displayed boards for easy identification of butterflies.