One Taiwanese tourist discharged from hospital | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 29, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

One Taiwanese tourist discharged from hospital

Zeseweiu Ku, one of the two Taiwanese nationals who were injured in the Jama Masjid firing on Sunday morning, was discharged from Lok Nayak Hospital on Monday.

delhi Updated: Sep 21, 2010 03:25 IST
HT Correspondent

Zeseweiu Ku, one of the two Taiwanese nationals who were injured in the Jama Masjid firing on Sunday morning, was discharged from Lok Nayak Hospital on Monday.

Thirty five-year-old Ku was hit at the back of his head, with a bullet grazing past his skull. Specialists from the neurology department conducted tests on Ku to assess the extent of damage, but no bullet was found inside his head.

Although Ku’s condition was stable, doctors at Lok Nayak had kept him under observation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

The other tourist, Chiang Ko (38), however, had a bullet embedded in the right side of his lower abdomen. He was taken into the operation theatre immediately after arriving at the hospital. The bullet was removed in a complex surgery that lasted four hours.

The bullet that pierced through Ko’s right side had damaged his vital organs, perforating his intestine and liver and leaving him critically injured. Ko is, at present, in the ICU and is likely to be kept under observation for a few more days.

“Both the patients are out of danger and are doing fine. One of them (Zeseweiu) will be discharged soon. Both have talked to their families,” said Amit Banerjee, medical superint-endent of Lok Nayak hospital.

Banerjee said Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit has also asked the hospital authorities to provide the patients food of their choice.

Dikshit visited the injured Taiwanese in the hospital on Monday. Although she refused to talk to the media after her visit, health officials said she asked them to monitor the status of the injured round-the-clock and take special care of them. Special arrangements were made to provide the victims interpreters, as they could not speak in English.

With inputs from agencies