Parents to file FIR against school today | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Parents to file FIR against school today

The death of Akkriti Bhatia, a class XII student of Modern School, Vasant Vihar, after she suffered an asthma attack during school hours on Monday has triggered a debate on whether educational institutions are well equipped to administer proper first aid in case of medical emergency.

delhi Updated: Apr 22, 2009 01:29 IST
Ritika Chopra& Jaya Shroff

The death of Akkriti Bhatia, a class XII student of Modern School, Vasant Vihar, after she suffered an asthma attack during school hours on Monday has triggered a debate on whether educational institutions are well equipped to administer proper first aid in case of medical emergency.

A day after Bhatia died on her way from school to the hospital, her family has decided to lodge an FIR against the school authorities on Wednesday, accusing them of negligence.

“We have lost our daughter and have nothing else to lose. The school is not adequately equipped to handle cases such as that of Akkriti, and asthma is very common among children nowadays. Our younger son is also studying there, but we’ll be pulling him out soon. We just want to ensure that other students of the school do not suffer like our daughter did,” said
father Vipin Bhatia.

Though the school had a full-time qualified nurse — who, according to the principal, was first employed with Holy Angels Hospital — attending to the student, Akkriti’s family feels that the teachers or the principal should have called an ambulance and not waited for the student’s car to arrive to take her to the hospital.

“Their school charges a separate amount as medical fee, then why is it that they don’t have an emergency doctor on call? A nurse is not good enough. And why was her oxygen mask taken off before she was sent to the hospital? They knew she was gasping for air,” said a student.

Principal Goldy Malhotra, however, has denied the allegation, saying that the school did the best it could to help the
student.

“Our nurse has more than 18 years of experience and is well qualified. The child had a history of asthma. I am told that she was quite unwell three days ago and was taken to a nursing home then. When she complained to the teacher about feeling breathless, she was administered oxygen by the nurse and we took the call to take her to the hospital even though her parents wanted us to send her home,” Malhotra said.

Akkriti died on her way to Holy Angels Hospital, which is a stone’s throw away from the school. “She was brought dead to the hospital. We gave her shock treatment and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, but she showed no signs of life. Her pupils had dilated and there was no pulse or BP,” said Rajnish Bharti, chief medical officer, Casualty, Holy Angels Hospital.