PCR personnel to be trained for emergencies | delhi | Hindustan Times
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PCR personnel to be trained for emergencies

There are many occasions when PCR vans take accident victims to hospitals. But as they are not equipped to provide medical attention, victims die on the way. Neelam Pandey reports.

delhi Updated: Aug 15, 2012 23:26 IST
Neelam Pandey

There are many occasions when PCR vans take accident victims to hospitals. But as they are not equipped to provide medical attention, victims die on the way.

To minimise such incidents, police officials manning PCR vans will be trained by international experts to tackle such emergency situations.

To begin with, the Delhi Disaster Management Authority (DDMA) will train selected officers who will then train the rest of their staff in batches.

The course will also be made a part of Delhi Police training. Earlier too, Delhi Police officials were trained in batches, but since there were constant transfers from PCR to other departments, a number of trained staff would be shifted out.

“We want to train the personnel manning the PCR vans so that precious lives can be saved during the golden hour. Sometimes, ambulances take time to reach accident sites and PCRs are the first respondents, which is why we want to train them first. International experts have been roped in for the purpose,” said a senior Delhi government official.

An international team of doctors and paramilitary staff will train national trainers of DDMA, who will then train Delhi Police staff.

“It is quite a Herculean task to train the entire 85,000-strong force of Delhi Police. We are still trying to identify senior police officers who can serve as trainers and provide regular training to the rest of the staff. This way we will be able to cover the entire force,” added the official.

Last year, PCR vans had taken nearly 50,000 injured persons to hospitals. There are approximately 630 PCR vans in the city and every van is manned by three persons, which means close to 2,000 staff work in a single shift.

Mock drills were conducted in February this year by DDMA and the National Disaster Management Authority to gauge the response of various government agencies in responding to emergency situations.

Following this, an audit was conducted by observers from the Indian Army that had pointed out that the PCR vans in the city were the first to reach the spots, followed by fire and medical teams.