Plea seeks review of court's BRT order | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Plea seeks review of court's BRT order

Two weeks after the Delhi high court dismissed a plea seeking scrapping of the bus rapid transit (BRT) in South Delhi, a fresh plea seeking a review of the decision was filed on Tuesday. Harish V Nair reports.

delhi Updated: Oct 31, 2012 01:02 IST
Harish V Nair

Two weeks after the Delhi high court dismissed a plea seeking scrapping of the bus rapid transit (BRT) in South Delhi, a fresh plea seeking a review of the decision was filed on Tuesday.

The petition says that the 5.8km stretch between Ambedkar Nagar and Moolchand was chosen against the norms of the master plan Delhi 2021.

The HC had on October 18 said the BRT was not an 'irrational decision' by the government and dismissed the plea to scrap it after a nine-month hearing.

The decision came as a huge boost to the Delhi government, which had 14 more such projects in the pipeline.

The review petition, set to come up for hearing soon, heavily banks on the observation of the court that the row over the BRT erupted because the Delhi government had chosen one of the 'narrowest' and most 'congested' stretches for its pilot project.

Col BB Sharan of NGO Nyaya Bhoomi, the petitioner in the public interest litigation that sought scrapping of the project, said, "We are seeking a review of the October 18 judgment. It had ignored the norms in the MPD 2021 that specifically lays down that BRT cannot be allowed in a road which was less than 45 metres in width. If the judges consider this aspect, there could be a re-thinking on this stretch as well as other similar stretches planned in the capital."

"In para 13 of the judgment, the court stressed that MPD 2021 is a statutory plan and has the force of law. As per the master plan, the BRT cannot exist on a road less than 45 metres in width," said the petition.

On May 12, the court had allowed other vehicles on the BRT as part of a feasibility study undertaken by the Central Road Research Institute (CRRI).

The court had opened the corridor to other vehicles after the CRRI said commuters benefited without the BRT.