Printed on currency paper, Games tickets finally launched | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Printed on currency paper, Games tickets finally launched

The Commonwealth Games tickets are finally here. And for the first time in the history of this sporting event, tickets have been printed on the same paper as currency notes. HT reports.

delhi Updated: Aug 26, 2010 00:01 IST
HT Correspondent

The Commonwealth Games tickets are finally here. And for the first time in the history of this sporting event, tickets have been printed on the same paper as currency notes.

The tickets, printed in the same press in Pune that prints R 1000 currency notes and contains similar anti-counterfeit measures, said the Organising Committee (OC) while launching the Phase-II of ticket sales.

"These tickets have some visible as well as invisible security features," said Lalit Bhanot, OC secretary general.

Until now, the OC was only carrying out online booking through its website and issuing e-vouchers. The holders of the vouchers will have to get them replaced with real tickets at counters.

"The hologram and the bar code on the ticket are just two of the numerous visible security features. The bar codes will be read with scanners. So, faking them will be next to impossible," said Monica Jolly, director, Ticketing.

In Delhi and the NCR, tickets will be available at 30 retail outlets, along with the website.

So far the OC has generated Rs 10 crore in revenue from ticket sales.

Countries like Australia, New Zealand, Canada, UK and USA have registered maximum bookings from abroad.

While the sales have been less than estimated, organisers said they were expecting sales to pick up pace now that the physical tickets are here.

"We have to take a decision on corporate bulk bookings, which will boost sales. There are queries from several companies," said Bhanot.

Delhi Celebrates

Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit launched her government's two-month-long Games-related cultural extravaganza called "Delhi Celebrates" by unveiling a theme song and a logo.

Composed and performed by Palash Sen, lead vocalist of band Euphoria, the song is titled Dilli meri jaan, Dilli meri shaan.

Free access

The OC has arranged for

the crew of broadcasters who will be in India to cover the Games, to get free access to ASI-protected monuments so that they can show India's glory in their coverage. "The broadcasters will also get facilitation for visits to Agra and Jaipur, " said an OC official.