PT Usha: I will say ‘no’ to a biopic until India wins Olympic gold in athletics | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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PT Usha: I will say ‘no’ to a biopic until India wins Olympic gold in athletics

PT Usha, India’s sprint queen, missed a medal in the 1984 Olympics by 1/100th of a second. As a coach, she dreams of winning gold through her students. Which actor might be able to play PT Usha on screen? ‘No one,’ says her husband.

delhi Updated: May 15, 2017 16:44 IST
Ruchika Garg
Athlete PT Usha, known as the ‘sprint queen’, says that if she had a better exposure, she would have won gold in the 1984 Olympics.
Athlete PT Usha, known as the ‘sprint queen’, says that if she had a better exposure, she would have won gold in the 1984 Olympics. (Rajesh Kashyap/HT Photo )

Pilavullakandi Thekkeparambil Usha, or PT Usha, is a legend. And legends deserve a biopic, as we know from Bollywood and Hollywood. But Usha isn’t interested — as a coach, she is just as focussed on winning medals as she was in her track and field career.

On a visit to Delhi for an event, the 52-year-old Usha tells us, “Every day, I get four-five calls from filmmakers across the world. They all want to make a movie on my life and journey, but every time, I say no.” Why so? “This is not the right time,” says Usha. “My dream is to see an Indian with a gold medal in athletics in the Olympics. The day this dream comes true, I will say yes to a filmmaker.”

Usha, who visited Delhi for the GAIL Indian Speedstar Season II Finale, is now coaching young athletes in her private academy, preparing them for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

If a biopic were to be made, which actor could play PT Usha? Pat comes the reply from her husband, V. Srinivasan: “No one. At present, no one can portray her. She is one of the most hardworking and sincere sportspersons; if any random actor portrays her, the audience won’t like it.”

Recalling the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics moment, when she missed the 400 metre hurdle bronze by 1/100th of a second, she says, “It still gives me the chills. I can’t forget that moment. Even after finishing the race, I was not tired at all. The athlete in me didn’t come out properly and I blame it on the exposure. If I had got a better exposure, I would have won.”