Ramadoss under CBI scanner for nod to medical college | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Ramadoss under CBI scanner for nod to medical college

Former union health minister and PMK leader Anbumani Ramadoss is under the scanner of CBI for allowing an Indore-based medical college to enroll students for academic year 2008-09 despite the Supreme Court denying permission to the college. Rajesh Ahuja reports.

delhi Updated: Mar 11, 2011 02:36 IST
Rajesh Ahuja

Former union health minister and Pattali Makkal Katchi (PMK) leader Anbumani Ramadoss is under the scanner of CBI for allowing an Indore-based medical college to enroll students for academic year 2008-09 despite the Supreme Court denying permission to the college.

Ramadoss was the health minister in the UPA-1 government.

The PMK is an ally of the DMK in Tamil Nadu and is likely to give up a seat for the Congress after last week's alliance break-up and make-up drama.

On September 26, 2008, the Supreme Court denied permission to the Indore-based Index Medical College as a Medical Council of India (MCI) inspection team found that the college did not have the minimum infrastructural and teaching facilities, sources said.

The same day, the health ministry gave permission to the college to admit students on the basis of a report given by another inspection team sent by it. The permission was given late in the evening, CBI sources said. Investigators are now probing the role played by Ramadoss. Despite repeated attempts, he did not respond to HT’s queries.

The CBI has already searched Ramadoss’s then OSD DS Moorthy’s house in Chennai on February 21 and he has also been questioned, sources said.

Investigators are probing the communication between Ramadoss and Moorthy on the evening of September 26, 2008. The CBI registered an FIR in this regard in July 2010. The FIR named two doctors of Delhi’s Safdarjung Hospital as accused as they were part of the inspection team sent by the health ministry.

Sources said the MCI teams had inspected Index Medical College four times in 2008. After going through the inspection reports, the MCI executive committee recommended the college should not be allowed to admit 150 students for 2008-09 as it lacked the infrastructure. The college went to the SC against the MCI recommendation.

The SC ordered on September 26 that the college cannot be allowed to admit students due to inadequate facilities. Sources said the health ministry had formed an inspection team on September 24, 2008. The next day, it inspected the college and on the day the SC denied permission, the ministry gave nod for renewal of permission for admission of the second batch of 150 MBBS students for 2008-09.