Rules flouted, UIDAI set to change | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Rules flouted, UIDAI set to change

The UIDAI has decided to simplify biometric collection process after it found that some private agencies avoided taking certain details of citizens to save time.

delhi Updated: Apr 06, 2012 03:20 IST
Chetan Chauhan

The UIDAI has decided to simplify biometric collection process after it found that some private agencies avoided taking certain details of citizens to save time.

As per the protocol, the agencies are required to take two biometric details – three impressions of 10 fingers and iris scan – and four photographs of a person. A review of the enrollment of 20 crore people in the first phase has revealed how the agencies have flouted the protocol by not collecting all required details.

"It can lead to problems when the UIDAI launches its authentication service," the authority’s director general RS Sharma told a meeting of enrollment agencies Tuesday. To reduce errors, he said only one photograph, one impression of 10 fingers and one iris scan of a person will be taken from the next phase starting from April end. http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/4/06_04_pg13b.jpg

An agency in Jharkhand claimed that it could not capture well the fingerprints of people in a village. It could provide only iris details to generate Aadhar number of around 200 residents.

“There is a provision in the UID guidelines to avoid taking one of the biometric details, either finger prints or iris detail, if it is of poor quality or not available. It is called forced capturing,” said a UIDAI official. However, he said, it could be done only in exceptional cases and the reason for the same should be provided.

A few agencies seemed to have misused this provision to speed up the process. A private agency gets up to Rs. 50 for each successful Aadhaar number generation. It also came to the notice of the UIDAI that some agencies showed physically-fit people without their hands to avoid taking fingerprints.

“In cases where the agency claims that a person does not have fingers, his photograph showing hands should be produced as evidence,” Sharma said. But some photographs, according to him, revealed that the agencies has played truant.

Some agencies also undermined the UIDAI’s high-quality software, the review has revealed. They took two or three pictures of a person as against the mandatory four.