Rural development ministry a hub of Maoist victims | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 21, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Rural development ministry a hub of Maoist victims

It seems IAS officers kidnapped by Maoists can find postings in rural development ministry. Minister Jairam Ramesh has already made T Vijay Kumar (kidnapped by Maoists in 1993) a joint secretary and R Vineel Kumar (abducted last year) his private secretary.

delhi Updated: Jun 03, 2012 22:49 IST

It seems IAS officers kidnapped by Maoists can find postings in rural development ministry. Minister Jairam Ramesh has already made T Vijay Kumar (kidnapped by Maoists in 1993) a joint secretary and R Vineel Kumar (abducted last year) his private secretary. No wonder, when Sukma collector Alex Paul Menon was released by the Maoists, Ramesh got a call from a top Chhattisgarh official: “Sir, one more possible recruit for your ministry.”

Uneasiness in PIB over recent transfers
Uneasiness is brewing in Press Information Bureau after certain officers relieved from duty this week were asked to join their new postings. These officers are resisting the transfer, saying they have been done in an irrational manner. Another grouse is they were being relieved even though the I&B Ministry has not decided on their representation against the transfer. The ministry says it was implementing a fair transfer policy.

Planning commission officials upset with panel members
Senior planning commission officials are upset with the way plan panel members are using young professionals to flout rules. Recently, a senior official refused to approve expenditure by some young professionals on the ground that it violated expenditure rules. Only when secretary Sindhushree Khullar requested did he agree to approve the spending but with a condition that he not be held responsible for any future objections.

SSC holds workshop to educate officers on RTI
After the Central Information Commission imposed heavy penalties on its officers, the Staff Selection Commission promptly organised a workshop for its officers to educate them about the information law. It turned out that the basic flaw in the way SSC officers were handling RTI requests was that they were treating the requests as public grievances. Of course, the workshop did help update them on the RTI rules and sent a message that this law did have teeth that could bite.