SC restricts entry to advocates, bar protests | delhi | Hindustan Times
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SC restricts entry to advocates, bar protests

Advocates are up in arms against the Supreme Court decision to introduce a new swipe card security system that restrict entry to its staff and Supreme Court Bar Association (SCBA) members.

delhi Updated: Nov 11, 2009 00:41 IST
Satya Prakash

Advocates are up in arms against the Supreme Court decision to introduce a new swipe card security system that restrict entry to its staff and Supreme Court Bar Association (SCBA) members.

On Tuesday, lawyers raised slogans against Chief Justice of India (CJI) K.G. Balakrishnan as he inaugurated the new security system. “CJI go back, go back,” shouted the lawyers.

Under the new system, entry to the court’s premises would be allowed only through special proximity cards/swipe cards.

SCBA President M.N. Krishnamani tried to convince the CJI to allow entry of advocates on the basis of identity cards issued to them by the respective state bar councils, to no avail.

“We do not want to give proximity cards to these Ghaziabad lawyers and others,” the CJI said.

Krishnamani said he would try again, on Wednesday.

“Every advocate is entitled to appear before the Supreme Court. Their entry cannot be restricted in the name of security.
I will mention it before the CJI tomorrow and try to convince him again,” he told Hindustan Times.

Krishnamani said several advocates, who were not members of SCBA, missed their cases as they were stranded at the reception trying to get entry passes issued. “You can’t expect five lakh advocates to become SCBA members or get passes issued on a daily basis. This won’t work.”

In the new system, the main building of the court housing the registry and courtrooms has been declared a high-security zone. Only those who have proximity cards will be able to enter directly.

Advocates, clerks, court staff and journalists can enter Supreme Court premises only if they swipe the photo proximity cards. Litigants, government officials and visitors would have to show a valid reason and an identity proof to get a normal photo identity pass issued to enter the main court building.


‘My Father’s a bad man’
Torn between the sparring parents, the seven-year-old boy, who was allegedly kidnapped by his mother and brought to India from US, broke down before the SC on Tuesday.

Aditya created a flutter in the court of Justice Tarun Chatterjee and said he didn’t want to go to his father. “My father is a bad man,” Aditya told the judges before a packed courtroom.

The CBI had traced Aditya and his mother, Vijayshree Voora, to Chennai on October 25 after SC directed the agency to do so. The direction came on a petition filed by Aditya’s father, V. Ravi Chandran, who has accused Vijayshree of kidnapping the child.

Aditya’s persistent requests to be with his mother were ignored by the bench. The court directed him to stay at the CPWD guesthouse where he has been living after the CBI traced him and his mother to Chennai on October 25.

The bench also permitted Aditya’s father to meet him for an hour. It also fixed November 12 for hearing the case after learning that Vijayshree had filed an affidavit.